alternativeblackgirl:

jatel0:

For The Masses:
http://gen.lib.rus.ec
http://textbooknova.com
http://en.bookfi.org/
http://www.gutenberg.org
http://ebookee.org
http://www.manybooks.net
http://www.giuciao.com
http://www.feedurbrain.com
http://oll.libertyfund.org/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=380
http://www.alleng.ru/ 
http://www.eknigu.com/ 
http://ishare.iask.sina.com.cn/
http://2020ok.com/
http://www.freebookspot.es/Default.aspx
http://www.freeetextbooks.com/
http://onebigtorrent.org/
http://www.downeu.me/ebook/
http://forums.mvgroup.org
http://theaudiobookbay.com/
More Here


Reblog to save a life.

alternativeblackgirl:

jatel0:

For The Masses:

http://gen.lib.rus.ec

http://textbooknova.com

http://en.bookfi.org/

http://www.gutenberg.org

http://ebookee.org

http://www.manybooks.net

http://www.giuciao.com

http://www.feedurbrain.com

http://oll.libertyfund.org/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=380

http://www.alleng.ru/ 

http://www.eknigu.com/ 

http://ishare.iask.sina.com.cn/

http://2020ok.com/

http://www.freebookspot.es/Default.aspx

http://www.freeetextbooks.com/

http://onebigtorrent.org/

http://www.downeu.me/ebook/

http://forums.mvgroup.org

http://theaudiobookbay.com/

More Here

Reblog to save a life.

marxvx:

legit capitalism is at its dumbest when you think about private ownership of land unrelated to commodity production. like, a landlord owning an apartment complex that he doesn’t even live in and gaining the ability to kick tenants out of apartments that he doesn’t even use. and in 300 years the only argument that has been offered in favor of this by liberal philosophers is “uh well they have a natural right to control land that other people use and live on”

raresenses:

femtoxic:

-imaginarythoughts-:

land-of-propaganda:

Shaun King exposes Ferguson PD lie about distance from SUV
Click here to watch the video

This needs to be brought to attention IMMEDIATELY!!!!!

I don’t even understand what they’re expecting anymore. if they can lie to us to our face and us KNOW the truth, what power do we have , then?

that’s a great question. I wish someone had a viable answer, because I’m losing hope fast and in a hurry.
Zoom Info
raresenses:

femtoxic:

-imaginarythoughts-:

land-of-propaganda:

Shaun King exposes Ferguson PD lie about distance from SUV
Click here to watch the video

This needs to be brought to attention IMMEDIATELY!!!!!

I don’t even understand what they’re expecting anymore. if they can lie to us to our face and us KNOW the truth, what power do we have , then?

that’s a great question. I wish someone had a viable answer, because I’m losing hope fast and in a hurry.
Zoom Info
raresenses:

femtoxic:

-imaginarythoughts-:

land-of-propaganda:

Shaun King exposes Ferguson PD lie about distance from SUV
Click here to watch the video

This needs to be brought to attention IMMEDIATELY!!!!!

I don’t even understand what they’re expecting anymore. if they can lie to us to our face and us KNOW the truth, what power do we have , then?

that’s a great question. I wish someone had a viable answer, because I’m losing hope fast and in a hurry.
Zoom Info
raresenses:

femtoxic:

-imaginarythoughts-:

land-of-propaganda:

Shaun King exposes Ferguson PD lie about distance from SUV
Click here to watch the video

This needs to be brought to attention IMMEDIATELY!!!!!

I don’t even understand what they’re expecting anymore. if they can lie to us to our face and us KNOW the truth, what power do we have , then?

that’s a great question. I wish someone had a viable answer, because I’m losing hope fast and in a hurry.
Zoom Info
raresenses:

femtoxic:

-imaginarythoughts-:

land-of-propaganda:

Shaun King exposes Ferguson PD lie about distance from SUV
Click here to watch the video

This needs to be brought to attention IMMEDIATELY!!!!!

I don’t even understand what they’re expecting anymore. if they can lie to us to our face and us KNOW the truth, what power do we have , then?

that’s a great question. I wish someone had a viable answer, because I’m losing hope fast and in a hurry.
Zoom Info
raresenses:

femtoxic:

-imaginarythoughts-:

land-of-propaganda:

Shaun King exposes Ferguson PD lie about distance from SUV
Click here to watch the video

This needs to be brought to attention IMMEDIATELY!!!!!

I don’t even understand what they’re expecting anymore. if they can lie to us to our face and us KNOW the truth, what power do we have , then?

that’s a great question. I wish someone had a viable answer, because I’m losing hope fast and in a hurry.
Zoom Info
raresenses:

femtoxic:

-imaginarythoughts-:

land-of-propaganda:

Shaun King exposes Ferguson PD lie about distance from SUV
Click here to watch the video

This needs to be brought to attention IMMEDIATELY!!!!!

I don’t even understand what they’re expecting anymore. if they can lie to us to our face and us KNOW the truth, what power do we have , then?

that’s a great question. I wish someone had a viable answer, because I’m losing hope fast and in a hurry.
Zoom Info
raresenses:

femtoxic:

-imaginarythoughts-:

land-of-propaganda:

Shaun King exposes Ferguson PD lie about distance from SUV
Click here to watch the video

This needs to be brought to attention IMMEDIATELY!!!!!

I don’t even understand what they’re expecting anymore. if they can lie to us to our face and us KNOW the truth, what power do we have , then?

that’s a great question. I wish someone had a viable answer, because I’m losing hope fast and in a hurry.
Zoom Info
raresenses:

femtoxic:

-imaginarythoughts-:

land-of-propaganda:

Shaun King exposes Ferguson PD lie about distance from SUV
Click here to watch the video

This needs to be brought to attention IMMEDIATELY!!!!!

I don’t even understand what they’re expecting anymore. if they can lie to us to our face and us KNOW the truth, what power do we have , then?

that’s a great question. I wish someone had a viable answer, because I’m losing hope fast and in a hurry.
Zoom Info
raresenses:

femtoxic:

-imaginarythoughts-:

land-of-propaganda:

Shaun King exposes Ferguson PD lie about distance from SUV
Click here to watch the video

This needs to be brought to attention IMMEDIATELY!!!!!

I don’t even understand what they’re expecting anymore. if they can lie to us to our face and us KNOW the truth, what power do we have , then?

that’s a great question. I wish someone had a viable answer, because I’m losing hope fast and in a hurry.
Zoom Info

raresenses:

femtoxic:

-imaginarythoughts-:

land-of-propaganda:

Shaun King exposes Ferguson PD lie about distance from SUV

Click here to watch the video

This needs to be brought to attention IMMEDIATELY!!!!!

I don’t even understand what they’re expecting anymore. if they can lie to us to our face and us KNOW the truth, what power do we have , then?

that’s a great question. I wish someone had a viable answer, because I’m losing hope fast and in a hurry.

golfdad1992:

Isn’t amazing how people don’t give a shit about misogyny until they can accuse muslims of it in order to justify their islamaphobia?

vrixie:

irisannwest:

do you ever

do you ever just have

that one class

that one freaking class

that just depresses you when you think about it because

oh god you hate it so much

The bourgeoisie

20aliens:

Ralph Goings - Photorealist
 ”In 1963 I wanted to start painting again but I decided I wasn’t going to do abstract pictures. It occurred to me that I should go as far to the opposite as I could. … It occurred to me that projecting and tracing the photograph instead of copying it freehand would be even more shocking. To copy a photograph literally was considered a bad thing to do. It went against all of my art school training… some people were upset by what I was doing and said ‘it’s not art it can’t possibly be art’. That gave me encouragement in a perverse way, because I was delighted to be doing something that was really upsetting people… I was having a hell of a lot of fun…”"My paintings are about light, about the way things look in their environment and especially about how things look painted. Form, colour and space are at the whim of reality, their discovery and organization is the assignment of the realist painter."

20aliens:

Ralph Goings - Photorealist

 ”In 1963 I wanted to start painting again but I decided I wasn’t going to do abstract pictures. It occurred to me that I should go as far to the opposite as I could. … It occurred to me that projecting and tracing the photograph instead of copying it freehand would be even more shocking. To copy a photograph literally was considered a bad thing to do. It went against all of my art school training… some people were upset by what I was doing and said ‘it’s not art it can’t possibly be art’. That gave me encouragement in a perverse way, because I was delighted to be doing something that was really upsetting people… I was having a hell of a lot of fun…”
"My paintings are about light, about the way things look in their environment and especially about how things look painted. Form, colour and space are at the whim of reality, their discovery and organization is the assignment of the realist painter."

uispeccoll:

uwmspeccoll:

We’re kicking off a new weekly feature here at UWM Special Collections - Fine Press Fridays! One of our goals in Special Collections is to document the history of the book and how the form of the book has been used by publishers and printers to express their ideas throughout time. As such, we have a strong focus on works produced by the fine press movement. The contemporary fine press printing movement originated in the 19th century with the work of Englishman William Morris. Disenchanted with current printing methods and desirous of returning to a time when books were printed with care and artistry, Morris founded the Kelmscott Press in 1891, printing books by hand using handmade paper and ink. The movement spread to several countries and continues to this day.   
Our inaugural Fine Press Friday piece is A Note by William Morris, in which Morris describes his goal to create books “which would have a definite claim to beauty, while at the same time…be easy to read and…not dazzle the eye, or trouble the intellect of the reader by eccentricity of form in the letters.” The final book printed at Kelmscott Press in 1898, the work relays Morris’s ideas of what constituted a beautiful book, his attempts to “redeem the Gothic character from the charge of unreadableness which is commonly brought against it,” the history of Kelmscott Press, and a bibliographic list of every work Morris printed at Kelmscott. One of the most unique features about this book is that it contains all three types designed by Morris; the main body of text is set in his Golden typeface, while quoted passages from Morris’s lecture “The Lesser Arts” appear in his Chaucer and Troy typefaces. The book also contains examples of Morris’s ornamentation and features a wood engraving by Edward Burne-Jones. 
See it in the catalog here.




Fine Press Friday?  Yes, please!
Zoom Info
uispeccoll:

uwmspeccoll:

We’re kicking off a new weekly feature here at UWM Special Collections - Fine Press Fridays! One of our goals in Special Collections is to document the history of the book and how the form of the book has been used by publishers and printers to express their ideas throughout time. As such, we have a strong focus on works produced by the fine press movement. The contemporary fine press printing movement originated in the 19th century with the work of Englishman William Morris. Disenchanted with current printing methods and desirous of returning to a time when books were printed with care and artistry, Morris founded the Kelmscott Press in 1891, printing books by hand using handmade paper and ink. The movement spread to several countries and continues to this day.   
Our inaugural Fine Press Friday piece is A Note by William Morris, in which Morris describes his goal to create books “which would have a definite claim to beauty, while at the same time…be easy to read and…not dazzle the eye, or trouble the intellect of the reader by eccentricity of form in the letters.” The final book printed at Kelmscott Press in 1898, the work relays Morris’s ideas of what constituted a beautiful book, his attempts to “redeem the Gothic character from the charge of unreadableness which is commonly brought against it,” the history of Kelmscott Press, and a bibliographic list of every work Morris printed at Kelmscott. One of the most unique features about this book is that it contains all three types designed by Morris; the main body of text is set in his Golden typeface, while quoted passages from Morris’s lecture “The Lesser Arts” appear in his Chaucer and Troy typefaces. The book also contains examples of Morris’s ornamentation and features a wood engraving by Edward Burne-Jones. 
See it in the catalog here.




Fine Press Friday?  Yes, please!
Zoom Info
uispeccoll:

uwmspeccoll:

We’re kicking off a new weekly feature here at UWM Special Collections - Fine Press Fridays! One of our goals in Special Collections is to document the history of the book and how the form of the book has been used by publishers and printers to express their ideas throughout time. As such, we have a strong focus on works produced by the fine press movement. The contemporary fine press printing movement originated in the 19th century with the work of Englishman William Morris. Disenchanted with current printing methods and desirous of returning to a time when books were printed with care and artistry, Morris founded the Kelmscott Press in 1891, printing books by hand using handmade paper and ink. The movement spread to several countries and continues to this day.   
Our inaugural Fine Press Friday piece is A Note by William Morris, in which Morris describes his goal to create books “which would have a definite claim to beauty, while at the same time…be easy to read and…not dazzle the eye, or trouble the intellect of the reader by eccentricity of form in the letters.” The final book printed at Kelmscott Press in 1898, the work relays Morris’s ideas of what constituted a beautiful book, his attempts to “redeem the Gothic character from the charge of unreadableness which is commonly brought against it,” the history of Kelmscott Press, and a bibliographic list of every work Morris printed at Kelmscott. One of the most unique features about this book is that it contains all three types designed by Morris; the main body of text is set in his Golden typeface, while quoted passages from Morris’s lecture “The Lesser Arts” appear in his Chaucer and Troy typefaces. The book also contains examples of Morris’s ornamentation and features a wood engraving by Edward Burne-Jones. 
See it in the catalog here.




Fine Press Friday?  Yes, please!
Zoom Info
uispeccoll:

uwmspeccoll:

We’re kicking off a new weekly feature here at UWM Special Collections - Fine Press Fridays! One of our goals in Special Collections is to document the history of the book and how the form of the book has been used by publishers and printers to express their ideas throughout time. As such, we have a strong focus on works produced by the fine press movement. The contemporary fine press printing movement originated in the 19th century with the work of Englishman William Morris. Disenchanted with current printing methods and desirous of returning to a time when books were printed with care and artistry, Morris founded the Kelmscott Press in 1891, printing books by hand using handmade paper and ink. The movement spread to several countries and continues to this day.   
Our inaugural Fine Press Friday piece is A Note by William Morris, in which Morris describes his goal to create books “which would have a definite claim to beauty, while at the same time…be easy to read and…not dazzle the eye, or trouble the intellect of the reader by eccentricity of form in the letters.” The final book printed at Kelmscott Press in 1898, the work relays Morris’s ideas of what constituted a beautiful book, his attempts to “redeem the Gothic character from the charge of unreadableness which is commonly brought against it,” the history of Kelmscott Press, and a bibliographic list of every work Morris printed at Kelmscott. One of the most unique features about this book is that it contains all three types designed by Morris; the main body of text is set in his Golden typeface, while quoted passages from Morris’s lecture “The Lesser Arts” appear in his Chaucer and Troy typefaces. The book also contains examples of Morris’s ornamentation and features a wood engraving by Edward Burne-Jones. 
See it in the catalog here.




Fine Press Friday?  Yes, please!
Zoom Info
uispeccoll:

uwmspeccoll:

We’re kicking off a new weekly feature here at UWM Special Collections - Fine Press Fridays! One of our goals in Special Collections is to document the history of the book and how the form of the book has been used by publishers and printers to express their ideas throughout time. As such, we have a strong focus on works produced by the fine press movement. The contemporary fine press printing movement originated in the 19th century with the work of Englishman William Morris. Disenchanted with current printing methods and desirous of returning to a time when books were printed with care and artistry, Morris founded the Kelmscott Press in 1891, printing books by hand using handmade paper and ink. The movement spread to several countries and continues to this day.   
Our inaugural Fine Press Friday piece is A Note by William Morris, in which Morris describes his goal to create books “which would have a definite claim to beauty, while at the same time…be easy to read and…not dazzle the eye, or trouble the intellect of the reader by eccentricity of form in the letters.” The final book printed at Kelmscott Press in 1898, the work relays Morris’s ideas of what constituted a beautiful book, his attempts to “redeem the Gothic character from the charge of unreadableness which is commonly brought against it,” the history of Kelmscott Press, and a bibliographic list of every work Morris printed at Kelmscott. One of the most unique features about this book is that it contains all three types designed by Morris; the main body of text is set in his Golden typeface, while quoted passages from Morris’s lecture “The Lesser Arts” appear in his Chaucer and Troy typefaces. The book also contains examples of Morris’s ornamentation and features a wood engraving by Edward Burne-Jones. 
See it in the catalog here.




Fine Press Friday?  Yes, please!
Zoom Info
uispeccoll:

uwmspeccoll:

We’re kicking off a new weekly feature here at UWM Special Collections - Fine Press Fridays! One of our goals in Special Collections is to document the history of the book and how the form of the book has been used by publishers and printers to express their ideas throughout time. As such, we have a strong focus on works produced by the fine press movement. The contemporary fine press printing movement originated in the 19th century with the work of Englishman William Morris. Disenchanted with current printing methods and desirous of returning to a time when books were printed with care and artistry, Morris founded the Kelmscott Press in 1891, printing books by hand using handmade paper and ink. The movement spread to several countries and continues to this day.   
Our inaugural Fine Press Friday piece is A Note by William Morris, in which Morris describes his goal to create books “which would have a definite claim to beauty, while at the same time…be easy to read and…not dazzle the eye, or trouble the intellect of the reader by eccentricity of form in the letters.” The final book printed at Kelmscott Press in 1898, the work relays Morris’s ideas of what constituted a beautiful book, his attempts to “redeem the Gothic character from the charge of unreadableness which is commonly brought against it,” the history of Kelmscott Press, and a bibliographic list of every work Morris printed at Kelmscott. One of the most unique features about this book is that it contains all three types designed by Morris; the main body of text is set in his Golden typeface, while quoted passages from Morris’s lecture “The Lesser Arts” appear in his Chaucer and Troy typefaces. The book also contains examples of Morris’s ornamentation and features a wood engraving by Edward Burne-Jones. 
See it in the catalog here.




Fine Press Friday?  Yes, please!
Zoom Info
uispeccoll:

uwmspeccoll:

We’re kicking off a new weekly feature here at UWM Special Collections - Fine Press Fridays! One of our goals in Special Collections is to document the history of the book and how the form of the book has been used by publishers and printers to express their ideas throughout time. As such, we have a strong focus on works produced by the fine press movement. The contemporary fine press printing movement originated in the 19th century with the work of Englishman William Morris. Disenchanted with current printing methods and desirous of returning to a time when books were printed with care and artistry, Morris founded the Kelmscott Press in 1891, printing books by hand using handmade paper and ink. The movement spread to several countries and continues to this day.   
Our inaugural Fine Press Friday piece is A Note by William Morris, in which Morris describes his goal to create books “which would have a definite claim to beauty, while at the same time…be easy to read and…not dazzle the eye, or trouble the intellect of the reader by eccentricity of form in the letters.” The final book printed at Kelmscott Press in 1898, the work relays Morris’s ideas of what constituted a beautiful book, his attempts to “redeem the Gothic character from the charge of unreadableness which is commonly brought against it,” the history of Kelmscott Press, and a bibliographic list of every work Morris printed at Kelmscott. One of the most unique features about this book is that it contains all three types designed by Morris; the main body of text is set in his Golden typeface, while quoted passages from Morris’s lecture “The Lesser Arts” appear in his Chaucer and Troy typefaces. The book also contains examples of Morris’s ornamentation and features a wood engraving by Edward Burne-Jones. 
See it in the catalog here.




Fine Press Friday?  Yes, please!
Zoom Info

uispeccoll:

uwmspeccoll:

We’re kicking off a new weekly feature here at UWM Special Collections - Fine Press Fridays! One of our goals in Special Collections is to document the history of the book and how the form of the book has been used by publishers and printers to express their ideas throughout time. As such, we have a strong focus on works produced by the fine press movement. The contemporary fine press printing movement originated in the 19th century with the work of Englishman William Morris. Disenchanted with current printing methods and desirous of returning to a time when books were printed with care and artistry, Morris founded the Kelmscott Press in 1891, printing books by hand using handmade paper and ink. The movement spread to several countries and continues to this day.   

Our inaugural Fine Press Friday piece is A Note by William Morris, in which Morris describes his goal to create books “which would have a definite claim to beauty, while at the same time…be easy to read and…not dazzle the eye, or trouble the intellect of the reader by eccentricity of form in the letters.” The final book printed at Kelmscott Press in 1898, the work relays Morris’s ideas of what constituted a beautiful book, his attempts to “redeem the Gothic character from the charge of unreadableness which is commonly brought against it,” the history of Kelmscott Press, and a bibliographic list of every work Morris printed at Kelmscott. One of the most unique features about this book is that it contains all three types designed by Morris; the main body of text is set in his Golden typeface, while quoted passages from Morris’s lecture “The Lesser Arts” appear in his Chaucer and Troy typefaces. The book also contains examples of Morris’s ornamentation and features a wood engraving by Edward Burne-Jones. 

See it in the catalog here.

Fine Press Friday? Yes, please!

bombaycinemaclub:

The first sip of tea is always the hardest.

that isn’t supposed to be inspirational, I’m just stating it’s fucking nerve-racking waiting for it to touch your lips and potentially having it melt your face off 

taiikawaii:


trilliansthoughts:

This miniature ecosystem has been thriving in an almost completely isolated state for more than forty years. It has been watered just once in that time.The original single spiderwort plant has grown and multiplied, putting out seedlings. As it has access to light, it continues to photosynthesize. The water builds up on the inside of the bottle and then rains back down on the plants in a miniature version of the water cycle.
As leaves die, they fall off and rot at the bottom producing the carbon dioxide and nutrients required for more plants to grow.

if you don’t think this is fucking rad then get out of my face

taiikawaii:

trilliansthoughts:

This miniature ecosystem has been thriving in an almost completely isolated state for more than forty years. It has been watered just once in that time.

The original single spiderwort plant has grown and multiplied, putting out seedlings. As it has access to light, it continues to photosynthesize. The water builds up on the inside of the bottle and then rains back down on the plants in a miniature version of the water cycle.

As leaves die, they fall off and rot at the bottom producing the carbon dioxide and nutrients required for more plants to grow.

if you don’t think this is fucking rad then get out of my face